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Published on January 22nd, 2018 | by Merion

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The Learn to Crochet Project: Week Three!

Welcome to Week Three of The Learn to Crochet Project CAL! This week Joanne and Kat will be showing you how to make a hat using the skills you have learned, with a couple of new techniques too!

Choosing a size

Often patterns come in a range of sizes; either to produce a different sized item (lap blanket to kingsize bedspread) or to give you the best fit for a wearable item. When we write a pattern in multiple sizes all sizes are written out in a list which is held in brackets ( ), the smallest size is outside of the brackets and the other sizes are within them, separated by commas.

Before you begin you will need to measure yourself or your intended  recipient. For hats, measure straight around the head above the ears. For socks, measure around your foot just below where the big toe starts and the length of your foot from heel to longest toe. For mittens, around your palm at the widest point.

You will then need to select the size you need based on information given in the Sizes section of the pattern. For example if your head measures 20 inches around and the pattern sizes are 17 (19, 21) inches and the pattern tells you to choose a size smaller than your head, you would choose the middle size.

It is best to go through the pattern marking the size you chose in each instruction to make it easier to follow. When you see only one number given in an instruction then that is to be used for all sizes.

Sometimes sections of the pattern will only relate to one size or a selection of sizes. This will be proceeded by a header saying something like For Sizes S and M ONLY. If your size isn’t listed, move onto the next section in which your size is listed in or the next section with a header saying For ALL Sizes.

Techniques you’ll need:

 

Slip Stitches

To make a slip stitch, insert your hook into the top of the next stitch.

Yarn over and pull through both loops on the hook.

Working into a Loop

There are a couple of ways you can begin working in the round.

Starting with a long chain and joining the ends together with a slip stitch to work in a tube shape

OR

Working from a centre point and growing outwards.

To work from the centre point out, start with a small chain of stitches.

Place the first chain you worked  back on your hook.

Yarn over and pull through both loops on your hook to slip stitch these 2 chains together.

Your stitches are then worked into the centre of this loop.

How to slip stitch to join a round

Slip stitches are used to close off a round.

  1. Work the last stitch in the round.
  2. Insert your hook into the top first stitch of the round
  3. Make a slip stitch to close off the round.

Some tips to know where to insert your hook:

If your pattern says to count your chain as a stitch, make the slip stitch into the top of the chain.

If your pattern says not to count your chain as a stitch, work the slip stitch into the first stitch in the round.

Counting will help you know which stitch is your last and where to go next.

Working into chain spaces

Sometimes you are asked to work into chain spaces rather than the stitch itself. This creates an open and lacy texture, and is one of the main characteristics of the granny square we know and love.

To work into a chain space you insert your hook into the hole in the fabric formed by the chain on the previous row, and work the stitch around that chain.

You work around the chains, so that the bottom of the stitches wrap around them.

Increasing and Corners

Increasing in crochet is easy – you simply work multiple stitches into the same stitch of the row below.

In the hat, increases are made at the 6 corners of the hexagon shape by working 3 trebles, 2 chains and another 3 trebles into each of the 2 chain spaces around.

In pattern speak increases can be shown with instructions like “2tr in next” or in this case the increase would be written as (3tr, ch2, 3tr) in ch-sp, with the ( ) signifying they are all worked in the same stitch.

You can see how this creates corners.  As your piece grows, look for these turns in the work as they are a good visual cue for where to work your increases.

As the pattern grows, you will work groups 3 tr into the single ch spaces around, with the increases staying in the same 6 corners.

How to decrease

Decreasing in crochet (usually shown as the stitch abbreviation with a 2tog at the end), is simply working two stitches as one.

In general, to decrease two stitches, you work the first stitch as normal, stopping before the last ‘yarn over and draw through all loops on hook’ step, then work the next stitch in the same.

Finally, work a yarn over and draw through all loops to close the stitches all together.

Double Crochet Two Together (dc2tog):

  1. Insert your hook into the next stitch and draw up a loop. 2 loops on hook
  2. Insert your hook into the next stitch and draw up a loop. 3 loops on your hook.
  3. Yarn over and pull through all 3 loops on your hook.

The Hat

Size:

Finished length: 19 (21)cm/7.5 (8.5)in

Finished circumference: 49 (61)cm/19 (24)in

Materials:

1 50g ball of Willow & Lark Ramble (DK weight, 100% superwash wool, 50g/125m) in Shade 125 – Col A

1 50g ball of Willow & Lark Ramble (DK weight, 100% superwash wool, 50g/125m) in Shade 105 – Col B

1 50g ball of Willow & Lark Ramble (DK weight, 100% superwash wool, 50g/125m) in Shade 111 – Col C

4.5mm hook

Tension:

5 treble clusters and 10 rows in pattern to 10cm/4in using 4.5mm hook (or size needed to obtain tension)

Skill level: Beginner

Skills Used: Basic crochet stitches, working in rounds, decreasing.

Construction:

Worked in rounds, the hat starts at the crown, increased until the right size is reached, then worked without increases.  The brim is worked in double crochet.

Stitches and Abbreviations

This pattern uses standard UK terms (US conversions given in brackets).

Ch – chain

Ch-sp – chain space

BLO – back loop only

Htr –  half treble crochet (US half double crochet)

Slst – slip stitch

Tr – treble crochet (US double crochet)

Special Stitches

ch-sp

Pattern Notes

Turning chain does not count as a stitch.

The pattern:

Crown:

Using Col A, ch5 and join with a slst to form a loop.

Rnd 1: Ch3, [3tr into loop, ch1] six times, join with a slst. 6 trcl sts

Rnd 2: Join Col B into the last ch-sp worked, ch3, [(1trcl, ch1, 1trcl) into ch-sp, ch1] six times, join with a slst. 12 trcl sts

Rnd 3: Join Col C into the first ch-sp worked in the previous rnd, ch3, [(1trcl, ch1, 1trcl) into ch-sp, ch1, 1trcl in next ch-sp, ch1] six times, join with a slst. 18 trcl sts

Rnd 4: With Col A, working into the first ch-sp worked in the previous rnd, ch3, [(1trcl, ch1, 1trcl) into ch-sp, ch1, {1trcl in next ch-sp, ch1} twice] six times, join with a slst. 24 trcl sts

Large Size ONLY

Rnd 5: With Col B, working into the first ch-sp worked in the previous rnd, ch3, [(1trcl, ch1, 1trcl) into ch-sp, ch1, {1trcl, ch1} three times] six times, join with a slst. 30 trcl sts

Working Even

ALL Sizes

Continue working in the stripe pattern.  Small size will start this section with Col B and Large size with Col C.

Rnd 1 – 13: Join the next colour in your stripe pattern into the first ch-sp worked in the previous rnd, ch3, *1trcl in ch-sp, ch1; rep from * around, join with a slst. 24 (30) trcl sts

Break yarn.

Brim

Rnd 1: With Col A, ch1, 1 dc in each st and ch-sp around, join with a slst. 96 (120) sts

Rnd 2: Ch1, *2dc, 1dc2tog; rep from * around, join with a slst. 72 (90) sts

Rnd 3-6: Ch1, 1dc in each st around, join with a slst. Break yarn.

Finishing:

Weave in ends. Block.

With your spare yarn, make a pom pom using your desired method and attach to the crown of the hat.

Join our Facebook group and share your crochet projects!

Follow the YouTube link below to find all The Learn to Crochet Project CAL videos!

crochet videos

 

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About the Author

Merion dreams in colour and adores crochet! From glorious granny blankets to ethereal shawls and lace cardies, she's never very far from her hooks! She loves cake, knitting, heavy horses, books and Mozart. Her favourite colour is duck egg blue.




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