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Published on March 31st, 2017 | by Siân

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The Pilgrimage to Granny Square

The mystery behind this annual trip to Granny Square for crocheters has been revealed!

The legend of the Pilgrimage to Granny Square may not be one you are familiar with unless you’re a committed and true granny square crocheter. It has recently come to light that for centuries people flocked to one sacred place with their WIPs and hooks to craft together in celebration.

Granny Square was an ancient public market place, and is the namesake of the squares that many of us continue to crochet today. The public space became known as Granny Square because of the number of grandmothers who took to relaxing in the gardens there.

The now-famous crochet square pattern was created to immortalise the gardens and the respected elderly in the community. In celebration, hundreds of elderly crafters made the annual journey to Granny Square where they could crochet, sell their wares, and catch up with friends.

This yearly tradition continued through many generations until the late 18th century when the area was abandoned due to a locust infestation.

Until recently, it was not clear where the pattern of the basic granny square design originated. Thanks to the work of some persistent archeologists and anthropologists around the world, the secret has been revealed. In the latest published ‘Society of Archeology’ journal, it was revealed that several stone structures were uncovered on a site believed to be the long-abandoned Granny Square.

An artist’s impression was created over the sketches of the site’s discoveries:

Since the archeological discovery, crocheters from around the world have begun a revival and started a crafting pilgrimage to visit the site. They expect to arrive by the beginning of April, and they have been creating a crochet granny square afghan along the way in memory of the grandmas who started it all.


About the Author

is an artist and works in the Social Media team at LoveCrafts HQ. She taught herself to knit when she was 17 years old, and hasn't stopped since! You'll normally find her in an art gallery, or buried in a book.




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